Category Archives: 3D Printing

Sanctum Upgrades: Resurrecting the Colido DIY, Part 3

There were a lot of maintenance items that I ended up trying/doing, and I don’t feel like dragging this out any further, so I’m trying to condense the rest of what I did here.

Smooth Motion Maintenance:

This is a combination of some general maintenance items. I replaced all the bearings I was able to. This included the ones on the hot end carriage and on the vertical axis, but I had no way to easily swap out the ones on the print bed carriage.

While I’m thinking about it, remember that if you have to swap out bearings, put the thicker white lithium grease on the inside of the new bearing before putting it on the rod, to make sure the bearing gets fully lubricated. When you’ve finished assembling, make sure to move the bearings back and forth several times to make sure the lubrication spreads within the bearing evenly.

While doing that, I cleaned and lubricated all the linear rods and z-axis screws. I also replaced all the timing belts. I think this has reduced the friction greatly, and improved the smoothness/ease of motion.

Here’s one of the bearings I replaced on the extruder carriage.

Stepped Spool Holder:

As I discovered in the previous post in this series, the smooth spool holder allowed the spools to slide off, and I remembered that there was a stepped variant. I printed off one of those, assembled it… and it works much better! The steps keep the spools on top of the printer, despite the vibrations from the printer’s motion in certain circumstances.

This spool holder allows for quicker filament changes, without having to fiddle with an exterior spool holder. This is especially helpful as the original spool holder had required disassembling the holder each time I wanted to change filaments, and clamping to keep it from moving in the way of the print bed.

Hot End Replacement:

I was having some temperature fluctuations on the hot end, at least in what temperatures were registering. I’m so glad I started using Octoprint and could monitor temperature telemetry!

Based on talking with other people about it, and looking at the symptoms, it appeared to be something wrong with the thermistor and/or the wire connecting it to the control board. I was considering replacing the thermistor, but I was having difficulty finding a compatible one. I was, however, able to find a replacement hot end from the manufacturer, which would give me the added benefit of replacing the nozzle and lining tube at the same time, so I swapped out the whole assembly.

It was a straight up swap for identical parts, though it was tedious because of the cable wrapping that had to be removed in order to remove the old wires and include the new ones.

This stuff is necessary to reduce wear on the wires, but annoying to implement.

Cooling Fan Addition:

The major issue I was seeing with overhangs and general print quality was an overheating issue. There are a couple ways to address aspects of this: adding a silicone sock to reduce reheating issues, and/or adding a cooling fan to make the top surfaces cool more quickly. For now I’ve only implemented the latter option. I’ve been unable to find a compatible silicone sock so far.

thedayowl on Thingiverse designed a fan duct for a blower fan to be added to the carriage. You can find it here. I printed it out, ordered the other parts, and attached it to the assembly.

The trickiest bit was figuring out how I was supposed to connect the power. There’s an open connection on the board that provides sufficient power continuously. You can’t control it through the software, but I don’t see the harm in letting that small blower run continuously.

By the way, the connector on the board is NOT the standard connector it looks like, and I’m not sure what it is, so I made do with a dupont connector.

Gear Grinding/Nozzle Turnoff/Layer Shift

There was an intermittent issue that I’ve had with the stepper motors (particularly on the y axis, but occasionally on the x axis) moving unexpectedly, often running into the end stop and grinding the belt. When that happened, the hot end would turn off (causing the filament to stop flowing and just grind), and the printer would lose track of the hot end’s location (causing massive layer shifts), both of which ruined the print. I attacked this from a few different angles. Replacing the belts earlier in the process was part of one of the attempts, as I’ve had issues with slippage before, as well as just part of replacing older parts.

Stepper Motor Driver Tweaking:

Based on a recommendation I’ve gotten from some other people, I got a multimeter to check the stepper motor drivers, and a ceramic screwdriver to adjust the voltage. I’ve tried tweaking it a few times, but I didn’t really see any improvement.

Power Supply Replacement:

Upon other recommendations, I decided to try getting a replacement power supply. I’ve been told that the one that came with the printer is considered a really reliable brand, but since I’ve swapped out the power supply the printer seems to have stopped having that intermittent failure.

Finished

With all that finished… WOW. This older printer can now print better than my newer one! I now do all my more precise prints on this printer.

For a point of comparison, here’s the before photo of the temperature towers printed on this printer.

Absolute rubbish!

And here’s the miniatures that I’m able to print now! I’ve been running it a lot lately building up my miniatures collection.

Thoughts/notes for the future:

If I run into issues on the hotend again, I think I may do what I’ve seen others do and switch to a more industry standard hotend, though that’d be an… interesting conversion process. It would make finding replacement parts a lot easier, though!

I think there is a little bit of a bed level issue, still, and I’m not sure how much is in the tramming and how much is in the metal bed I placed on it. It may be related to how I mounted the bed with command strips.

For now I’m printing mostly small items. When I print larger items I get a bit of warping, so I think I need to remember to implement brims on the larger ones. I’m not sure how much is due to the unheated bed, and how much from variations in leveling. And no, I’m not considering adding a heated bed anytime soon. From what I’ve read, trying to do a DIY heated bed increases the fire risk more than I am comfortable with.

At one point I was considering replacing the z-axis screws with thicker ones, but the manufacturer used a nonstandard interface piece (it had 3 holes instead of the standard 4), so I couldn’t easily swap them out without also having to print and install completely new blocks at the ends. This is the kind of nonsense that makes me want to scratch build a printer on my own down the line, with an eye for maintenance and using industry standard parts.

Anyway, I guess I’ve got to start working on the other printer soon to bring up the quality level on it! It feels kinda weird that my older and larger printer is currently better at producing the smaller miniatures. I need to address this imbalance, so I can print smaller things on the smaller printer and larger things on the larger printer.

Sanctum Upgrades: Rotating Miniatures Display

I decided that I wanted to be able to display and easily access my collection of D&D miniatures. I came across a concept for reusing empty filament spools. Their version had faceplates, but for the moment I just want to at least get this thing functional. I stacked my empty spools, and connected them with some tacky material.

It’s convenient, showing off my minis for ease of access… but the back half is hard to see and reach. This is where the turntable comes in. I had tried one version where it was a plate sitting on a single skateboard bearing, but that was too brittle and the whole thing wobbled (the spools make it top-heavy). So, I switched to this design:

You can find the original turntable design on Thingiverse here:

Manual Turntable by printedprops

I didn’t need the top plate, seeing as the bottom spool provides a surface to rotate on, but the bottom plate does provide a much more stable base to rotate the entire tower on.

I may end up upgrading the tower to have the nice stonework facings here, but so far I don’t want to give up the printer runtime for it. It was the inspiration for this project, though.

At any rate, I now have a way of seeing what minis I have, instead of having to dig through plastic containers. Maybe post-quarantine I can use it for hosting some RPGs.

Sanctum Upgrades: Mad Scientist Light Switch Cover

Every mad scientist’s lair needs an unusual light switch! I’ve had my eye on this one for years, but between printer size and reliability issues, I hadn’t had a chance to make this one until recently.

This one is actually someone’s remix of one that has been on Thingiverse for years. I think it came out really well. I had to use a bit of tack on the switch to get the “nubbin” to stay on well.

You can find the files (again, not mine) here:

Frankenstein Light Switch Redux 1.0 by Muckychris

I think there is a bit of a gap between the plate and the wall, so I’m probably going to put some weather stripping on the back for a cleaner appearance.

“IGOR! Where did we put those brains again?”

Sanctum Upgrades: Resurrecting the CoLiDo DIY, Part 2

I’ve continued to have major issues with the printer, so I’ve been reading even more, and stocking up on new parts and tools so I can perform more intensive maintenance and upgrades on the 3D printer.

One of the issues that I’ve had is that sometime mid-print the printer will appear to lose track of where the carriages are located, and also appear to not register the end-stops.

End-Stop Replacement:

I finally branched out into soldering, and got a soldering setup and heat gun.

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I’ve used this to replace all the end stops.  I cut the wires, and spliced new ones on, albeit clumsily.  There is an extra layer of heat shrink that I apparently thought was a good idea at the time, but I chose the wrong size.

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Build Plate Upgrade:

I decided to attach a metal build plate onto the printer, so that it would be smoother and more resilient than the standard plastic build plate.  I’m tired of having a plastic build plate that gets deeply scratched and deformed by a hot nozzle.  I think that having a metal bed will eliminate some of those issues, though it might cause more gear grinding issues if the printer loses it’s z-axis calibration again.

I had planned to do this by either 1) using binder clips to attach the plate or 2) use 3D printed mounts (along with some purchased screws, springs, and nuts).  I found that the binder clips that I bought were far too big for the printer, and also realized that I would need to make some gcode changes to account for their presence so that the nozzle wouldn’t run into them.   Even going with smaller clips would have had this issue.

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Photo of clips for illustrative purposes only

I also realized that the springs I had ordered were entirely too long (and possibly too stiff) to be used to mount the metal bed.  Maybe I’ll find a way to re-purpose these parts for another project later.

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So, I went with my default solution to problems.

Command strips.  I taped the plate to the plastic bed, and seems like it might work out alright.  I used the tape because with command strips, if it doesn’t work out you can easily remove them.  Down the line I’m wondering if I might need to replace them and add some sort of supports underneath the plate so it is even less likely to flex (it’s only supported in those 4 corners).

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Filament Spool Issues:

A separate issue I have is that loading and unloading filaments of different types was a pain.  The original spool holder that came with the printer requires disassembling and reassembling the holder around the spool every time I want to change filament.

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Also, from the angle the filament travels there is clearly a lot of friction over time.  The feed hole was originally round.

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I’m not sure whether this filament drag was contributing to some of the issues with the print head moving in unexpected ways, so I tried out adding an easier-to-use spool mount on top of the printer.

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The large parts are 3D printed, but it also uses 2 skateboard bearings.  I didn’t design this one, I found it on Thingiverse here:

Printrite horizontal spool holder

I figured that it would make loading and unloading filament much easier, and the different position plus the bearings would reduce any drag caused by the angles the filament had been travelling through.

Sadly, I’ve found that the spool will occasionally fall off the top of the printer when I try to use the new holder, and with a heavy spool that is too much of a risk of damage to the rest of the printer, so I’ve had to stop using it.  I may end up trying the version with the steps on it, in the hopes that the steps will keep the spools from falling.

I also designed and test printed a spool holder design of my own, but that ended up being it’s own separate set of issues.

Note:  This post is a case in point of why logging/blogging can be good for your hobbies.  You look at what you’ve done, what your problems were/are, and re-evaluate while you write.  I’m catching up on this a few weeks later, and I had forgotten that there was a stepped version of the spool holder that I can try.

To be continued…

Sanctum Upgrades: Pencil Cups

This is actually two items, but they are similar enough I felt I should lump them together.  I got tired of finding writing utensils everywhere in my living room (I’ve been working out of there a lot while my desktop computer was down).  I also got tired of having to dig around in the top of my toolbox for my 3D printing spatulas.

As a 3D printing guy… when you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail.  Or in this case, I’m not gonna buy a pencil cup when I have a 3d printer, time, and excess material lying around anyway.

I printed a pencil cup for the pencils and pens, and modified a dice tower model into a tool holder/pencil cup for the spatulas.  I figured I wanted something thematically appropriate for such items in my sanctum.

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If you want to make your own, you can find the models here:

Dodecahedron Cup (by Jayrobox)

Cyberpunk Tool/Pen/Pencil Cup (a remix by me)

In case you are wondering how that obviously top-heavy tool holder is staying up, I used a bit of tacky to secure it to the work bench.  This stuff:

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It’s some stuff I originally bought to hold items in place for painting, but it is useful for securing things in general.  As a kid I remember using a blue version of this for posters and craft projects.

Sanctum Upgrades: Resurrecting the CoLiDo DIY, Part 1

I decided, what with all this extra time at home, that I’d reassemble my old CoLido DIY 3D printer and increase my range of capabilities and throughput.

Self Education:

I’ve been working on educating myself more on FDM 3D printing, so I’ll have a better background for diagnosing issues and fixing problems.  Here’s my reading list so far:

3D Printing 101

This book has some useful info I hadn’t considered, but needs a trip to the editor for readability.

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3D Printing Failures: 

This book has a lot of useful information, minor editing/clarity issues, but is definitely based on a lot of experience and has helped me to better build my list of setting checks, maintenance items, and tests to run.

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3D Printing 101 video series.

This series is on the Maker’s Muse channel on Youtube.  I haven’t made it all the way through yet, but I plan on running it in the background a lot to try to absorb more information while making progress on this and other projects.

3D Printing 101 By Maker’s Muse

 

Early Work:

I’ve updated Octoprint to run multiple instances so I can control both printers from the same Raspberry Pi.  Here are the links I’ve used so far for it.  It doesn’t work perfectly, but at least it works for now.

Setting up Octoprint for Multiple Printers

Multiple Printers and Octoprint

I still want to get it set up with the Wyze camera, but so far no joy.  Here’s a link to some of the materials I’ve seen compiled on the subject so far.

Octoprint and Wyze camera

I’ve been tweaking and updating the CoLiDo’s settings within Simplify3D for better print quality.

Bed levelling went pretty well.  I ran a Calicat (calibration model) and a temperature tower, which both showed significant issues.

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I recalibrated the e-steps, and reprinted the temperature tower.  This showed little if any improvement.

I cleaned the extruder gear and radiator with canned air, but that didn’t seem to have much impact.

I also lubricated all the rods and pulleys, tightened the belts, and tightened all the screws on the printer.

And I still had issues.

To be continued…

 

 

 

Sanctum Upgrades: PPE Wall

I’m trying something new.  I thought I’d start breaking down some of the updates that clutter my other posts, particularly in the realm of trying to make my sanctum work better for me.  Maybe these will give you guys some ideas of how to customize your sanctums for the way you work.

This week’s upgrade: my Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) wall.

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Starting simply, I was fed up with the way I had my gear stored at/on my workbench.  Several items kept ending up on the bench or in my toolbox, which gets in the way.  I went to my old favorite for problem solving around here:  command strips.  I found a section of wall I wasn’t using for anything, added some command hooks for several items, and 3D printed a modified version of a mount for safety glasses.  I mounted everything with command strips, spacing everything out to be accessible.

Potential enhancements:  I still need a spot for my welding goggles and box of disposable gloves.  I haven’t figured out where or how I want to mount those yet.

Octoprint Upgrade In Progress

Whenever I would ask for help trying to get the wifi capabilities of my Monoprice Select Mini Pro working as they were originally advertised (specifically, where to get the firmware to reflash the printer’s wifi software), it seems like everyone just shouts “OCTOPRINT” at me instead of answering my question.

So, screw it, I’m trying Octoprint since I couldn’t get an answer to my original questions.  I’ve heard wonderful things about it, and it should hopefully give me most if not all the functionality I’d want long term, but it would have been nice to have been given an answer to the question that was asked.

I’m using a Raspberry Pi 4 to run Octoprint since the printer runs in a different room from my PC.  The image I started from is the OctoPi image, where someone made a disk image specifically for setting up Octoprint on a Raspberry Pi.  The initial image can be found here:

https://github.com/guysoft/OctoPi

So far it’s working pretty well, though I need to doublecheck and update my logbook to make sure everything is recorded.  Sadly, there was a gap in my process (prepping for a convention), so I’ve probably missed some important documentation.  There are a few things to note when installing one of these.

  1. The person who set up the OctoPi image is from the UK, so there are a number of localization settings on the image that need to be changed after install.
  2. DO NOT CHANGE THE PASSWORD UNTIL YOU’VE SET UP THE CORRECT KEYBOARD LOCALIZATION.  I wasn’t thinking, and the symbols when you hit shift + any number are NOT the same for various keyboard layouts, so I accidentally made my pi temporarily unusable because I couldn’t figure out where the symbols had moved to, so I had to reimage it and start over.
  3. Set an assigned IP address for your Pi from your wifi router’s control screen.  This way you won’t have to hunt for the correct IP address as you connect and disconnect various IoT devices to your network.
    1. I finally solved the issue of changing IP addresses that had caused issues with my wireless webcam, which turned out to just be a matter of setting them from the wifi router side.  I feel like a guy in a Civ game developing his tech tree out of order on that one.  It was a really simple change I should’ve already known how to do.
  4. Create a desktop shortcut that goes directly to your octoprint page.  It just makes things easier.
  5. RTSP webcam streams are not currently supported by octoprint.  If you are planning on using any of the Wyze series of internet webcams for monitoring your printer, it will not be supported natively by octoprint.  Some people have been working on workarounds, but I have not been able to make it work for myself yet.

 

Thoughts:

Now that I’ve at least got it running to a certain degree, here are my thoughts about Octoprint.

I like that I now have a telemetry feed, allowing me to monitor temperatures.  I got the impression there were big temperature fluctuations at one point, but now I can check the graph.  It has a default image in the background, but I was able to load my own custom one.

octoprint temp graph.PNG

I’m really enjoying increased functionality.  I no longer have to keep loading and slotting an SD card between my desktop and the printer in the other room.  I can just send files over, and tell it to print.  Much less of a hassle that way.

One of the plugins that I added is an e-stop.  I haven’t tested it, and it’s awkwardly located on the control page (right next to the settings menu), but at least it exists.

If I want to check whether the printer is ready and/or monitor it’s progress visually I currently still have to open VLC, but it’s at least there.  It just isn’t an all-in-one app setup at the moment.

 

Verdict:

Octoprint is an amazing tool, which gives me more information, more control, and saves me the hassle of moving files around manually.

Buuuut… it still needs some work.  Not supporting RTSP natively is really frustrating, as I was already using this camera specifically for monitoring 3D prints, but the app won’t let me view the feed directly.  There are multiple threads dedicated to people trying to figure this out, and following the directions people claim to have success with doesn’t appear to be working for me yet.

 

Misc Updates:

My printer is ALIVE again!  While I was performing maintenance, I discovered that the y-axis linear bearings were giving out.  That’s part of why everything was somewhat on hold with Octoprint, as I couldn’t really test it too well with a broken bearing.  I ordered parts, then discovered when I went to install them that I did not have the tools or expertise to swap them out easily.  I had thought that the bracket would come apart with screws.  Instead I found this:

linear bearing in bracket

Turns out these were press fit, so I ended up taking it to a machinist to swap them out.  He was able to remove the old bearings and insert the new ones in less than 10 minutes, and for much cheaper than if I had tried to get an arbor press to do it myself!  I’m definitely going to keep this shop in mind for future repairs and possibly for getting some custom parts made.

 

 

Link Dumping Ground:

This is kinda here as much for my reference as yours, so I can find these things again if I need to.

 

Here are the settings I used for setting up the printer’s config:
Monoprice Select Mini Settings for Octoprint

This page was helpful for trying to figure out a PIP not found issue with octoprint on my setup:

https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/linux/software/python.md

I’ve attempted these instructions to try to get my Wyze 2 webcam to work on here, but so far it’s not working for me.  I think I lack the fluency to see what’s going wrong yet.

RTSP on Octoprint Workaround

 

 

 

 

COM|POST: 3D Printer Feature Wishlist

After a few short years of using 3D printers, and reading up on them, here’s my wishlist of features that I’d love to have incorporated (or incorporate myself) into one FDM printer.

 

Accustomed Features:

These are ones I’ve gotten used to on my Monoprice Select Mini Pro:

Removable build plate:  Allows me to remove the print bed and work on removing the item from the bed at a more convenient height on my workbench.

Heated bed: Allows for more material options, and prevents some warping issues.

Build-tac plate:  Build plate surface material that doesn’t require frequent blue tape replacement or gluing.

Self leveling:  Leveling the printer manually is tedious and annoying, particularly if it shakes itself loose periodically.

Webcam:  I use a Wyze 2 camera to monitor my printer from other rooms and/or on the go, so I can tell if there is an issue.  I plan to integrate this with wifi control down the line, but I haven’t implemented that yet.

 

Common Features:

Commonly available, but not currently on my setup.

Direct drive:  My printer uses a Bowden tube setup, which doesn’t handle flexible filaments, but direct drive printers (printers where the extruder motor is directly above the nozzle) can.

Wifi printing:  Mine doesn’t work, at least not from the printer.  This is optional for me now that I am experimenting with Octoprint on a Raspberry Pi to control my printer, so it probably doesn’t need to be onboard.

Large print volume:  This has mostly been a matter of cost so far.  A tradeoff between quality and build size for me for my last purchase.

Printer enclosure:  Keeps the temperature more constant for printing.  Also would enable an air filtration system to avoid issues with toxicity and particles for a wider variety of print materials.

 

Less common features:

I’ve thought up or heard of these, but I don’t often see them as standard features if at all.

Filament Sensor:  Detects when filament is running out, pauses the print, and alerts the user to change out the filament without ruining the print in the process

Runaway heating cutout:  I’d just like a bit more assurance that I won’t have a printer fire issue with the nozzle and/or the heated printed bed.  I’d want the temperature sensors to be able to trigger the print to cancel and turn off the power to the heating systems if they started to get to dangerous ranges.

Multimaterial printing:  I’d like to experiment with some of the options of multimaterial printing, particularly with unusual filaments worked into common ones.

Fire suppression:  Call me paranoid, but I’d really like to make absolutely sure there is no chance of an out of control fire.  I’d want a system to detect fires, cut the power to the printer, and flood the enclosure with carbon dioxide, before venting to the exterior of the building through a filtration system.

Big red button:  I want a kill switch for the printer so that if something is going wrong I can immediately kill the print.  Preferences are for it to turn off power to the heating elements, stop all motion, and then raise the Z axis slightly away from the printer.  Needs to be a bit away from everything else, and be big, red, and slappable.

3D Printer Periodic Maintenance Items

I think now is as good a time as any to write something about 3D printer maintenance items while, since I’m going through some of them on my own printer right now.  Not all FDM 3D printers are built the same way, but some of these items should be pretty common.

HEALTH AND SAFETY:

I highly recommend wearing disposable gloves for this entire process.  Otherwise you will get a lot of various lubricants on your hands that may be difficult to remove.  I also tend to wear safety goggles and an apron to keep from getting these chemicals in my eyes or on my clothes, but that is probably overkill.

 

Lubrication:

Guide Rails and Z axis Screw Gear:

The printer’s parts move along guide rails, and there is often a screw gear used for the z-axis.  These all need to be cleaned and lubricated periodically to ensure smooth motion and precise prints.  For this I wipe them down the rods with clean cloths or paper towels.

Once they have been cleaned, I use a spray can of white lithium grease to reach the rails, and move the parts through their range of motion to ensure a reasonable spread of lubricant.

WARNING: Make sure that if you are using spray lubricant that your printer is in a location that you don’t overspray on other objects.

Note:  Listen out for any odd sounds after performing maintenance.  You might hear indications of issues such as linear bearing damage… *sigh*

 

Pulleys/gears:

It is also good to lubricate the pulleys and any gears.  I use sewing machine oil for this, as well as for some of the earlier parts that are hard to reach.

 

Tightening Belts:

Loose belts can cause issues with layer shift.  In my case, on my CoLiDo DIY, the print head would sometimes randomly slam into the y-axis stop and when it went to resume printing it would be off by a large amount.

This part will likely require you to look for more specific information on your printer.  It often requires removing one or more zip ties, loosening screws in a clamp around the belt, tightening the belt, screwing it back, and replacing the zip ties.  Some printers, like mine, appear to have a piece that is designed to maintain appropriate tension on it’s own, but I’m going to have to research that further.

 

Print Bed Maintenance:

Bed Leveling:

This will also require specific information for your model of printing, but it is very important to your print quality.  This will probably be a more frequent maintenance item than the others.

In my case my printer is supposed to use a self-leveling mode, but it still requires tweaking.  Bad leveling can cause issues ranging from poor print quality, adhesion issues, or even gouging your print surface.

Bed Surface Maintenance:

This will vary a bit depending on your bed material.

Plastic:

On my CoLiDo DIY the bed was plastic, and would occasionally get damaged during printing, so I had to use a razor blade and sandpaper to smooth the surface back out.

Build Surface on Metal:

On my Monoprice Select Mini Pro there is a rough build surface material attached to a metal plate which occasionally requires replacing.  I use a scraper and Goo Gone to remove the material and it’s adhesive, then rinse in water, dry thoroughly, and apply a new piece of material.

Glass:

I don’t have much experience with glass build surfaces, so I highly recommend looking up more information elsewhere.  I’m fairly certain that it requires periodic cleaning of the hairspray, glue, or slurry that people use to promote adhesion, and occasional replacement of the glass surface.

 

Tightening Screws:

Over time vibration can cause screws to loosen in many places on your printer.  You should probably check to make sure any and all fixed screws are tight to ensure precision.

 

Electronics Maintenance:

Check the electronics connections for issues, particularly at the connections that move, such as on the extruder head and on a heated bed.  Check for looseness, scorching, fraying, and anything else unusual, as this may indicate impending issues.

Use a can of air to remove dust from the control electronics periodically, like you would on a desktop computer.